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ioWNSEND's 

20™ CENTURY • 

CATALOGUE 




STRAWBERRIES 

f^ And How To Grow Them 'j 

g?^ E.W.Townsend&Son |S^ 

Wt h SALISBURY. MARYLAND ^i|w] 



^mlmi^^ 



The Principles of T his Business 

Are The Same Yesterday, To-day and To-morrow 



WE are trying to conduct this business along absolutely fair lines, for two rea- 
sons: First.— Because we believe in the principle of fairness. Second.— 
Because it pays in dollars and cents. In the beginning we discovered that 
we must have the confidence of our customers or the business would not succeed. 
There was no way of meeting all of our customers face to face, of establishing con- 
fidence by personal contact, so the simple plan was adopted ot gaining confidence 
by conducting our business so fairly that confidence would come to us by our acts. 
It was a fortunate policy, and we have stood by it for more than twenty-one years. 

That we do hold the full confidence of our customers will be seen by the 
amount of unsolicited testimonials which we are reproducing from all sections of 
the country. J 'l, These facts speak louder than any thing we could say. 

We are but human, we have made mistakes. It would be impossible to run 
any business as large as this without making mistakes, but we have never 
made an error that we were not willing to correct. We again thank our customers 
who have stood by us from the very small beginning, and who have recommended 
us to their friends. To these we attribute a good share of our success. 

Increased Acreage And Extra Fine Plants 

Again we have increased our acreage by more than loo acres. We have also 
bought two more farms adjoining our present plant farms comprising i6o acres. 
These we are preparing for our 1922 crop of plants. The season 192 1 has not 
been the best for plant making. We will have less than 50 per cent, of a crop of 
plants per acre. But we will have the finest crop of plants for quality we have ever 
been able to grow. Plants will be large and stalky, and sure to please you all. 
Notwithstanding our small crop per acre, we have kept the price down to the min- 
imum, and when the quality is considered, we offer you this season a mighty good 
buy. For after all it is the quality of plants that count most, and not price. 

Another season has passed and strawberries have sold for more money than 
any other commodity from the farm. Strawberry growers are more prosperous 
than any other class of farmers. ^1,000 per acre net for the 192 1 crop was a com- 
mon occurence. And as high as ^3,000 has often been reported. Our women 
customers have reported from ^200 to ^300 profits from very small gardens. Tak- 
ing the season as a whole it has been entirely satisfactory trom a strawberry grow- 
ers' view. We can see nothing in sight but good prices, for years tocorre, for big 
delicious berries. By the thousands of letters received from our customers from all 
over the country we would say that our family of customers are highly enthused 
over the prospects, and we look forward for another prosperous season for us all. 

May we have your orders early. 

Sincerely yours, 

E W. TOWNSEND Pres-Mgr. 




BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS 



OF- 



TOWNSEND'S CHOICE HIGH-GRADE 

STRAWBERRY PLANTS 



PREMIER (Kellogg^s Premier)— Per. 

Is the king of all strawberries. Premier is distinctly in a 
class by itself. Unquestionable the very best strawberry ever 
grown. Premier is adapted to all soils and climates. To describe 
it would be impossible in words. The only way you will ever 
know Premier is to see it as it is. Premier begins to ripen with 
the etxra early varieties and continues until most of the late sorts 
are well gone. Size is large to extra large, slightly p Dinted. 
Color bright red to the center, firm, with the very highest quality. 
In productiveness it can not be beat; it is in a class' by itself in ev- 
ery way, shape and form. In the past six years we have pro- 
bably sold 25,000,000 Premier plants. We have shipped them to 
every nook and corner of the United States, and never have we 
heard a word of complaint — but praise after praise has come 
from every source. 

The biggest profits ever made from strawberries that we have 
ever heard of has been made from the Premier. We have netted 
more than $3,000 ourselves from one acre. The' past season when 
freeze after freeze visited us during April and May, Premier 
yielded at the rate of more than 10,000 quarts per acre on our 
own grounds, and netted us more than $3,000 per acre, when such 
varieties as Klondyke were a total failure by their side. Prem- 
ier is the nearest frost-proof we have ever seen in a strawberry 
plant, not excepting the ever-bearing. 

We have received reports from our customers that have made 
bigger profits per acre than we have made. You will note that 
many of our customers mention Premier in writing about their 
success with Townsend's plants. We have 220 acres of Premier 
this season, as fine quality plants as it is possible to grow, but we 
will not be able to fill one-half the orders for Premier. While 
we are not the introducers of this grand variety, we have probab- 
ly done more to put it before the public than all the rest of plant 
growers combined. Five years ago we sent out more than 100,- 
000 plants of Premier as free samples in order that our custom- 
ers should see just what the behavior would be in their particular 
sections. These results were most gratifying to us, and has re- 
turned many fold to us in dollars and cents, besides putting cus- 
tomers and friends next to the best berry in the world. 

We note that some of our New England friends are catalog- 
ueing Premier under the name of Howard 17. We called their 
attention to this fact during 1920, and many of them claimed 
Howard 17 was a distinct variety. But I am pleased to see that 
most of them have given away to the fact. One of our N. J. plant 
breeders, from whom we purchased a good lot of Howard 17 
plants (getting his direct from the introducer of Howard 17), was 
gentleman enough to acknowledge to us after fruiting them again 
together that there was no difference. They were all the same. 

Copyrighted 1921 by E. VV. Townsend & Son 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



In writing to us the gentleman stated "You Win". 

The introducer has written a book on the subject quoting 
different growers who try to distinguish between them, and hold 
that Howard 17 is its name. We do not know which is the right 
name, but we know this, that it makes no difference by what name 
they are called, it is the same berry from the same seed, and it 
seems to me that as more than a hundred to one know it by the 
name of Premier, in order to cause less confusion on such a grand 
variety, Premier should be its only name. We have ten acres of 
the Howard 17 strain and any one wishing this strain can order 
them by that name this year, but in the future we shall no doubt 
grow only one strain and under one name. 

Some of our customers write us the Premier was introduced 
several years before the introducer of the Howard 17 had received 
his first plants, and that they thought it only fair to drop the name 
of Howard 17. 

THE PENINSULA 

The Eastern Shore of Maryland and Delaware section is the 
largest strawberry growing section in the world to its area. Growers 
here have been setting every Premier plant they could get for the 
past two years, and w^e are offered more every season by our home 
growers for plants than we are catalogueing them at. We are usually 
booked up on Premier very early in the season and dare not take 
more orders than we can fill. For a customer once he grows Premier 
he will have nothing else. Many growers book their orders during 
the summer before the plants are grown in order to be sure of get- 
ting their supply, and this is a sure way folks and should be made 
a rule. 

Premier is not only popular with the growers, but it is equally 
so with the buyers. There is no berry shipped on the market that 
sells for more money than does the Premier. We have commission 
men to come all the way from New York City to arrange for our 
crop of Premier berries. W. O. & H. W. Davis handle the Premier 
berries on a commission basis. We cannot furnish them with as 
many berries as they can sell at strickly fancy prices. Fifty and sixty 
cents per quart is not considered big money for Premier by Wilmer 
Davis. He has often told the writer whenever he had Premier ber- 
ries he could get just what he asked for them. 

PREMIER A LONG SEASON VARIETY 

It is not necessary to grow midseason varieties when the Pre- 
mier is grown as the season is usually four weeks of fruiting, and 
Premier covers the the period of all midseason to late varieties. 

If varieties are wanted to cover the entire time from extra early 
to extra late, we recommnd only three varieties as our choice, which 
we call our three-of-a-kind selection. Premier, Ford and Townsend's 
Big Late. Ford and Big Late continue to fruit extra late in the sea- 
son. Big Late being an imperfect variety. Ford is our choice to plant 
with it. Both Ford and Big Late are strickly high class varieties 
and wonderful productive, and are easily the cream of the list of 
late varieties. We absolutely guarantee these three varieties to be 
the most perfect varieties grown. They have been tested in pacti- 
cally all s3ctions of the country and we have never had a complaint. 
DON'T FORGET THE THREE— PREMIER, FORD AND TOWN- 
SEND'S BIG LATE. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 




vJ-V'I^S^U''-"^ 



■^ 



The cut here shown is a field of Premier that produced 320 32-qt. crates per acre, season 

1921, when such varieties as Klondyke were almost completely de?troyed 

by frost in the same field. 



FORD (Per) 

A STANDARD VARIETY— (LATE) 

Ford is a mid-season to very late, and as near an universal 
variety as it is possible to grow. We have vShipped plants from 
Florida to Maine and we have our first complaint yet to hear in 
the seven years since we first introduced it. Practically every 
State College who have tested it gave it the very highest recom- 
mendation. Ford is one of the hardiest growers on our list, and 
easy to grow in any soil or climate. Like Premier, it is a frost- 
proof variety, and will produce its regular heavy crop of fruit 
when most varieties are killed by frost or freeze. This proved to 
be true again the past season. In hundreds of fields throughout 
the country. Fruit is almost identical with that of the Premier, 
in both size and quality. One of the very best sorts to set with 
late imperfect varieties. And for the best pair late varieties, we 
recommend Townsend's Big Late and Ford for any section or for 
any use. They are both sure and heavy producers and will always 
bring top market price. Our customrs call it a Packard. 

Don't fail to place orders early, for either Ford or TowTisend's 
Big Late. 



EXTRA PLANTS— AND EXTRA COUNT— IS THE 
TOWNSEND WAY. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 




A FIELD OF GRAPE VINES, CURRANTS, GOOSEBERRIES, RASPBERRIES 
AND OTHER SMALL FRUITS. 

WORLD'S WONDER (Per) 

One of the very latest, and the largest berry grown. For 
past five years we have been selling Worlds Wonder plants. Have 
tested it for more than ten years. In size we have never seen its 
equal. In fact, , as many of our customers write us, it looks more 
like apples than strawberries in size. Wherever Worlds Wonder 
has been planted it has become the great favorite as a show ber- 
ry. Plas a most pleasant taste; one of the very hardy .growers, 
and few equal it in production. We have never had anything but 
praise come back and every year our sales more than ; double, 
which speaks louder than anything we could say. 

We just add, if you want to grow some of the King berries 
iu your locality, set some World's Wonder plants. We have 
made the oifer to give $10 in Gold to any grower who would send 
us a plant that would bear a larger berry than Worlds Wonder, 
and still hold the offer open. 

EARLY OZARK (Per) 

One of the very extra early varieties, large size, and very 
productive. Fruit round and very dark red, and very tart. Good 
market variety. 



PAN-AMERICAN BLACKBERRY, THE 20TH CEN- 
JURY WONDER. SEE PAGE 22 FOR DE- 
SCRIPTION AND PRICE. 



TRUE-TO-NAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 




M9. C. Roberts, of Montgomery Co., Ohio, sends us this photo — Nov. 7. This is a 
Townsend strawberry garden. Thousands of these gardens are being grown in all sections of 
the country and are proving very profitable to our customers. Some report cash sales 
from $200 to $300 besides furnishing their homes with all the berries they can use. TRY 
ONE THIS SEASON. 

EARLY JERSEY GIANT— Van Fleet Int (Per) 

A 'very large, medium-early berry of the highest quality; has 
a large green showy calx, extra large plants that hold the fruit 
well off the ground. Until the arrival of Premier we considered 
this our best early variety. Js a great favorite in N. J., and a 
money-maker. Seems to do well on most soils. Recommended 
by the leading nurserymen. Firm enough for Northern latitudes, 
not recommended for the South. 

BUSHEL BASKET (Per) 

This variety has had an unusual name. We secured some 
plants in 1920 from the introducer, Mr. Katkamier, of N. Y. State. 
We have seen no fruit but the growth of the plants fully live up 
to the description and name which he gives. Is without doubt 
the largest plant we have ever grown, and we are looking forward 
to see some fine large berries. The introducer offers $1,000 in 
Gold for 100 plants of any new strawberry that has the money- 
making qualities of the Bushel Basker strawberry. This is a 
pretty good offer and one we should all go after. We advise test- 
ing this varietv at once, and that you place order at once. We 
have a fine lot of plants. 



IF YOU WANT TO HELP— SEND US THE NAMES 
OF YOUR FRIENDS. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DFAI NURSERY 




Another field of Premier, showing how we pack them for market. Note how well the quarts 

are filled, and the bottom layers are guaranteed to be just as good as the top. There 

is no limit to the demand for Townsend's Premier strawberries. 



TOWNSEND'S BIG LATE (Imp) 

This is a variety that has been thoroughly tested for years, 
and is the running mate with Ford. Is a female or imperfect va- 
riety. Big Late differs from all other varieties, both in plants 
and fruit. Plants are tall and robust and each plant is surround- 
ed with large shining red fruit that looks like it had been pol- 
ished. Is firm, and of the very highest aromatic flavor and has 
won on every point of perfection that go to make 'up the straw- 
berry. We have kept Big Late in the pantry for several days 
without showing a sign of deterioration. Whenever placed on the 
market has alv/ays brought top-notch prices. Under ordinary 
culture it will easily yield at the rate of one quart per plant. And 
with high culture will double this quantity. Don't fail to set 
some of Big Late by the side of Ford and you will have a pair of 
winners. We expect to grow a large plot ourselves for fruit the 
coming year. Season medium late. 



CAMPBELL'S EARLY (Per) 

Not as good as Premier, but a good early variety and one 
that pays well; a good hardy grower of rich dark red berries; 
very firm and good quality. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 




TOWNSEND'S MISSIONARY.— See description below. 



MISSIONARY— Townsend's (Per) 

Missionary heaLS the list of ail extra early Southern varie- 
ties. Since 1906 Missionary has been growing more popular ev- 
ery year, not only in the South, but in the great strawberry sec- 
tions everywhere. It is truly a universal variety, and a money 
maker ever^^vhere,- and today is one of the most popular varieties 
on the markets. It is the Townsend Missionary that you see on 
the fruits stands in mid-winter selling for $1.00 and up per quart. 
It is the same Townsend Missionary that you see on the fruit 
stands late in the spring or early summer, bringing fancy prices 
that are being grown in the most Northern states. Some of the 
finest berries I ever saw were Missionary berries on a fruit stand 
in Boston, July 1st, grown in the Cape Cod section. Townsend's 
Missionary is an ideal berry for the new beginner to start with. 
Is one of the easiest berries ever grown. If you want to grow 
prize winners, grow them in hills the Townsend way. If you are not 
so particular about the large size, just set the plants, give them 
a little attention and a little manure and you can grow a bum- 
per crop of medium size berries with little expense. 

For fifteen years we have been growing an increased acre- 
age of Townsend's Missionary every year and the demand has in- 
creased every year with the supply. Some of the largest straw- 
berry sections in the world, like Marion Station, Md., grow more 
than 75 per cent. Missionary. Again we have grown MILLIONS 
of these plants on our new ground farms and hope to be able to 
supply the demand. 

It will pay you to send us the order for Townsend's Mission- 
ary, as we specialize in this variety, having introduced it year 
1906, and have taken great pride in the variety and have kept it 
fully bred up to the standard all the tme. And today our plants 
are even more productive than when we first set them out. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 







SENATOR DUNLAP 



SENATOR DUNLAP (Per) 

In a straw vote a few years ago Dunlap easily won over all 
others as the most popular strawberry. We do not recommend 
it for the South, but elsewhere it is indeed a great money maker 
and a good all purpose variety. Easy to grow, just the thing for 
the beginner. Will grow a full bed of plants on very poor soil 
and with very little manure. Is considered one of the very best 
for home use and canning. And in the North is considered one 
of the very best second early for market purposes. Exceed- 
ingly productive, plants small, but have long roots, that make it a 
sure cropper and great drougth resister. We have a ^wonderful 
productive strain of Dunlaps that never fail to please. And our 
prices are very low considering the quality of our plants. 

KLONDYKE (Per) 

The leading market variety for medium early in most South- 
ern states. We have one of the finest strains of Klondyke plants 
in the country. 

HAVERLAND (Per) 

A very popular standard variety, fruit medium to large, color 
light red, firm and ordinary quality. When set with Dunlap they 
usually make a good pair. Not recommended for Southern com- 
mercial use. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



GLEN MARY (Per) 

One of the old popular sorts for New England and most sec- 
tions of the North. Does not do so well in the East or South. Is 
of good size and exceedingly productive of rich colored berries, 
quality ordinary. We have many customers who will plant noth- 
ing else as a mid-season variety. 

PARSON'S BEAUTY (Per) 

One of the most productive varieties on the market in a mid- 
season berry. Large size and an excellent variety for the North 
or canning purposes. Not a good shipping variety from the South. 
When picked fresh from the vines is among the very best table 
berries. 

NIC OHMER (Per) 

A medium late variety that nas its greatest popularity in the 
West. Is an old favorite on the Pacific coast and most of our 
plants go there. Size medium to large with very high quality. 
Makes a great number of medium size plants that are given to 
rust in damp land in the East. To those who wish this variety 
we have a good stock of the old strain. 

AROMA (Per) 

The leading market berry in the West and many section of the 
South and Southwest. Size medium large and quality ordinary; 
season medium to late. 

GIBSON (Per) 

Berries large dark red; plants very productive, and hardy 
growers. Resembles Parsons Beauty. We have a good supply 

of plants and recommend it for our Northern customers who want 
a gDod productve berry for local market or home use. 

POCOMOKE (Per)— Same as Gibson 

PAUL JONES (Imp) 

This is truly a money maker; very productive of large size 
long pointed berries that are colorful all over. Is a strong heal- 
thy plant grower and one sure to please where quantity is the de- 
sired point. We have grown a good stock of plants. 

SAMPLE (Imp) 

One of the most popular old sorts and a variety sure to please 
all who grow it. Bright red in color, large in size, delicious in 
flavor, and very attarctive in appearance. Very productive and 
firm. Blossoms are imperfect and should be polinized with such 
varieties as Big Joe or Ford. 



WHAT EVERY BODY SAYS MUST BE SO. READ 
THE TESTIMONIALS. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



DR. BURRILL 

The Million Dollar Strawberry. 

If tiiere was a vote on the best varieties, Dr. Burrill would 
probably rank second choice following Premier. 

Dr. Burrill has most of the desirabhle qualities that go to make 
an ideal berry. Strong vigorous plants, long heavy roots, which 
always builds up a healthy Mother plant. Dr. Burrill is a heavy 
producer of strickly high class berries, which average in size from 
large to extra large. Is a wonderful plant maker if allowed its 
o'^vn way wliic-h is never good plan if the best results are obtained. 
We prefer the narrow matted row for Dr. Burrill. Dr. Burrill re- 
ce"ibles Sen. Dunlap so closely that it is hard to separate the two. 
But we are reliabely assured that Dr. Burrill is a seedling of Dun- 
lap and Crescent. We recommend Dr. Burrill anywhere for home 
garden use and our second choice for commerical use in all sec- 
tions North of the Mason-Dixie Line. We have an excellent sup- 
ply of Dr. Burrill this season. 

MRS. JOHNSON, of Nebr., writes November 1st:— I want to 
thank you for the fine strawberry plants sent to us last Spring. 
We have had plenty berries ail summer from the ever-bearers, and 
you should see our Dr. Burrill and Dunlap, they have covered the 
earth with plants. 




Two truck loads of 38 crates to a load, or 76 32-qt. crates, was picked from one acre of 
Premier strawberries during season 1921, and sold at the station for $9 60 per crate. $729 
for one days pick. More than 10,000 quarts per acre was produced from this field during 
the season. 



TRUE-T O-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLA NTS 

WM. BELT (Per) 

Is still a leader in many sections as a good late home market 
variety. It is ver- hard to surpass this variety in quality, but 
when we produce the Ford, Townsend's Big Late and Premier, 
Wm. Belt holds no longer the high honors of quality. But is 
still ahead of more varieties than are ahead of the Belt. 

BRANDYWINE (Per) 

But for a few customers we would discontinue Brandywine 
as there are so many better varieties. Season late, fruit large 
to very large, dark red and quality fair; a good strong plant 
grower. 

HORSEY (Per.) 

This is a valuable new variety introduced by J, C. Horsey, of 
Somerset County, Md. Season very early, plants large, stalky and 
very productive of large size, good quality berries ; color, dark red 
to center, firm enough for a good shipping variety. In the section 
where it was originated, around Marion Station, Md., it is fast be- 
coming a standard variety on account of its earliness and good ship- 
ping qualities. This is the first season we have grown t and have 
added it because we believe it a valuable addition to our list, and 
would advise our customers to give it a trial. 

GANDY (Per) 

One of the best known strawberries and one of the best all 
around berries. Does best on black springy soil but wil grow 
fairly well on clay soils, never plant on high sandy land. 



I received my plants on April 29th and 
they came in fine shape. They were A No. 
1 plants. I have bought from many nur- 
series but these are the best I ever saw. I 
will know who to deal with hereafter. Now 
Gentlemen. I think you made a mistake, I 
only ordered 210 Dr. Bcrrill. you sent me 
27.5; 200 Premier, you sent 275; now I am 
willing to p£y for these extra plants as they 
are all so nice. Wis'iing you success at all 
times, and can truthfully tell people you 
are square men. — I am yours truly 

A. E. Gumma (Penn.). 



My Premier strawberries were the first 
to ripen in this section, they sure are some 
berries. Never saw such loads on any 
plants, and the quality is good enough for 
a queen. We have already picked more 
than one quart for each plant set, and just 
commenced picking. We have sold none 
less than forty-five cents per quart: this 
is June 25th. Sorry we did not set more 
Premier. This patch of berries is the talk 
of the neighborhood, and you will get lots 
more orders from here. 

M. C. Mc. (Ohio). 




A COMMERCIAL TRIAL BED. Eyery strawberry grower should have a trial plot, aad 

test out in a small way all the new varieties. This is the way we find 

the BEST for our own soil. 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 




A Crate of PRESIDENT HARDING, Our New Late Berry. One of the largest and most 
productive commercial varieties we have ever tested. Fruit extra firm and good qual- 
ity. Color, dark red to the center, a strong plant grower and a winner in every way. 



PRESIDENT HARDING (Per) 

A perfect flowering medium to very late, extra strong hardy 
plant maker. Large foliage with very dark leathery appearance, 
fruiting stems long and erect, holding the fruit well off the 
ground. Extra long roots and a great drouth resister. Does not 
rust even in wet seasons. 

Size of fruit is extra large throughout the season. Extra 
good quality and firm. Color, deep red to center. Has no green 
tips, is a real show berry. President Harding is a chance seed- 
ling found by one of our growers seven years ago, and has been 
thoroughly tested in a number of soils, and I am more than anx- 
ious to have it given a further test in all parts of the country and 
believe that it will prove a winner for most of us who want a 
good late commercial variety as well as a good one for home use. 
DON'T FAIL TO TRY IT. 

CHESAPEAKE (Per) 

With the exception of plant growth Chesapeake is one of our 
very best varieties. Season very late and quality of fruit is very 
fine; size large to very large. Does best on rich springy soil. If 
your soil is high and thin, would not recommend Chesapeake, but 
rather such varieties as Ford, Big Joe, Dr. Burrili, etc., but if you 
have a good soil Chesapeake will do wonders for you. 

PRICES OF CHESAPEAKE PLANTS 

25 Plants 75c; 50 Plants $1.00; 100 Plants $1.75; 

250 Plants $3.00; 1000 Plants $10.00; 500 Plants at 1000 rate 



TRUE-TO-NAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 




LUPTON— Late (Per) 

Is truly a show berry and one of the very best sellers on the 
market. Plants are vigorous and productive. We have never seen 
a berry that makes a better show when crated up for shipment ; has 
a large showy calx that sets off the bright red berry. Lupton is sure 
to be a winner and we advise all commercial growers to try it. We 
believe for a late berry our customers in Florida could not get a bet- 
ter one, as its firmness would stand the long haul. Much better than 
Nic Ohmer in our opinion. 



A REPEATER. 

Bradford, 111. 

Plants you sent me were just fine, I never 

saw such nice ones. Thanks for being so 

prompt in sending them. Am sending you 

another order. 

Mrs. M. L. H. 

Cambridge, V't. 
Dear .Sir: — My surprise was great when 
I opened the box of plants and found so 
many more than I paid for. All large with 
heavy long roots. With best luck, I am 
yours truly 

Luther P. 



Oxford, Pa. 

Will not need any more plants this year, 

but wish you could see an acre of plants we 

have grown from the last year's planting, 

will send vou a photo. 

M. W. B 



Ruskin, Fla., Feb. 2, 1920. 
Dear Sirs: — I have the best berries this 
year I ever saw, everybody says they are 
the largest and fullest they ever saw grown 
here. I got the plants from you and want 
more just like them.— Respt. 

D. D. E. 



14 E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 




BIG JOE— (Joe Johnson) 



BIG JOE (Joe Johnson) 

A midseason to late variety and a greaf money maker in nearly 
all sections of the country. This is the fourteenth year that we 
have catalogued Big Joe. We have sold Big Joe plants by the mil- 
lions for the last ten years in all sections of the country and today 
it is among our very best sellers in practically all sections of the 
country. And especially through New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New 
York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Maine and New 
Hampshire. 

Big Joe is one of the very hardiest varieties in plant growth and 
a failure is seldom. Is one of the most productive varieties in our 
list. Fruit bright red, firm and good quality, size extra large. For 
the home garden plant some Big Joe and for commercial use plant it 
for dollars and cents. 

We always try to grow several million Big Joe plants every 
year and we have one of the finest crops this year we have ever 
grown. 

WARFIELD (Imp.) 

This is one of the old time varieties that we had discarded 
several years ago, but our customers in certain sections of the 
country kept calling for it, and for their benefit we have again 
added Warfield to our list. Warfield really needs no description 
but for the information of the new beginners will say that War- 
field is a close comptitor of the Dunlap, and being of imperfect 
blossom it should be set by the side of Dunlap, or some good mid- 
season perfect flowering variety. Fruit about same size as Dun- 
lap, and same quality, probably more firmer and for this reason 
is an ideal canner. Price same as Dunlap. 

TAKE NO CHANCES— TOWNSEND'S MISSORARY 
ALWAYS RELIABLE. 



TRUE-TOXAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 




A Dish of LLXKY BOY Everbearing Strawberries — one of the biggest — sweetest — and 
most productive of the everbearing. 

Townsend^s Everbearing S'^rawberries 

Hundreds of letters are received by us every year stating 
that our Everbearing plants are all and even more than we claim 
for them. 

A Towiisend Everbearing Strawberry Garden i.s one of the 
most pleasing and profitable crops ever grown. Thousands of 
kiddies have been made happy by the growing of one of these 
gardens. 

Besides the pleasure for the home, and the usefulness in hav- 
ing fresh strawberries for the table for several months in the 
same year plants are set, they are the most profitable crop grown 
in dollars and cents. 

It is nothing to get reports that from a few hundred plants 
more than a hundred dollars in cash has been received after sup- 
plying the famib'. 

^^"e are offering only the cream of the Everbearing varieties, 
grown in our own nurseries in the garden spot of the world. 



16 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



LUCKY STRIKE 

This is one of the finest ever-bearers for the Northern states. 
Is a strong healthy grower; makes long well rooted plants that 
are stalky in appearance and are able to hold up the wonderful 
load of bright red lucious berries which it abundantly producers. 
Some of our customers claim that Lucky Strike is the best of the 
ever-bearing, perferring it to the Lucky Boy or Progressive. We 
have a fine stock of plants again this season and have reuced our 
price to $25.00 per 1000, or $5.00 per 100. We introduced Lucky 
Strike season 1918 at $1.00 each and it has given wonderful ac- 
count of itself in all the Northern states, from Maryland up. Do 
not fail to order a few Lucky Strike. Only a dozen will give you 
a show to test its merits. 

LUCKY BOY (Per) 

We have never been able to supply the demand for Lucky 
Boy plants. At the same time we have cut our price half for 
this season in 1000 lots. When we introduced Lucky Boy we gave 
it this description: BIGGER, SWEETER AND MORE PRODUC- 
TIVE than any other ever-bearing strawberry. Ninety-nine per 
cent, of our customers who have grown it, and it has been sent to 
every State in the Union, will back this statement. Plant in good 
rich soil, grow in hill system, and you will have a gold mine. 
Both as an ever-bearer and a Spring cropper. 

PROGRESSIVE (Per) 

Is the universal ever-bearer, and is now known the country 
over and an unfaltering producer of the highest quality fruit. 
Begins to ripen early in season and will continue to fruit all the 
summer. Fruit medium to small and good quality for table use, 

SUPERB (Per) 

This was considered the largest of the ever-bearing strawber- 
ries until Lucky Boy was produced. In some sections it is a great 
favorite. Not a good producer in the fall in the states South of 
Delaware. We have a very fine stock of Superb plants. 



For many years I have been sending to 
Townsend for plants. He has never failed 
to send me satisfactory plants. I have 
recommended hundreds of berry growers 
from this section to you and all have been 
well pleased. Wish you could see my 
patch now. I am enclosing you an order 
for 1,500 plants for my neighbor. 

J. R. Conner (Fla.). 

The two bundles of Lucky Boy plants 
arrived in fine condition. I appreciate 
your liberal count and good plants. 

J. A. M. (N. J.). 

Received plants in fine order and they 
are growing fine. 

W. D. K. (Lansdale, Pa.). 



I have followed your ihstructions fo'- 
the last six years in growing berrie', and 
have never made a failure. Strawberry 
growing has brought me out of debt. I 
used to be in the Dairy Business but have 
side tracked that for strawberry growing. 
This is the seventh order to you for plants. 
With best wishes to you and the sons. 

E. C. Walnut. 



Starke, Fla., April 11, 1921. 
Gentlemen: — The plants came Saturday 
and they were in perfect condition. They 
looked like they had just been taken out 
of the ground. Foliage was scarcely wilt- 
ed. — Respt. your friend 

E. M. T. 



NO HOME GARDEN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT A BED OF 
EVER-BEARING STRAWBERRIES. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



17 



1921 PRICE LIST 1922 



-OF- 



;;Sr.de STRAWBERRY PUNTS 



Instructions for Determining the Cost of Plants. 

Beneath the varieties in each column below is a complete 
scale of prices which applies separately to each individual variety- 
listed in that column. If plants are wanted of more than one va- 
riety, figure each variety separate same as though you were or- 
dering only one sort. 



COLUMN 


1. 


DR. BURRILL 


GANDT 




KLONDYKE 




MISSIONARY 




SEX. DUXLAP 


WAR FIELD 


^Imp.) 


BIG JOE 




2.5 Plants. . 


.$ .50 


50 Plants. 


.75 


100 Plants. 


1.00 


200 Plants. 


1.50 


300 Plants. 


2.00 


400 Plants. 


2.50 


500 Plants. 


.3.00 


1,000 Plants. 


. 5.00 


.5.000 Plants. 


23.50 


10,000 Plants. 


45.00 



COLUIVIN 2. 



Gt 



PREMIER 
FORD 
LUPTON 
AROMA 

EARLY JERSEY 
EARLY OZARK 
FEXDALL (Imp.) 
GIB SOX 
GLEX MARY 
HOWARD 17 
HAVERLAXD Imp. 
KELLOGG Prize Im 
XIC OHMER 
PARSOXS BEAUTY 
PAUL JOXES, Imp. 
SAMPLE (Imp.) 
BIG LATE (Imp.) 
WM. BELT 



COLUMN 3. 



BUSHEL BASKET 
CAMPBELL'S Early 
PROGRESSIVE 
SUPURB 

WORLD'S WODER 
PRES. HARDIXG 
HORSEY 
MASCOT 

CHESAPEAKE 

See prices on page 12 



50 
ir)0 

200 

300 

400 

.',(»() 

1,0C0 

5,000 

10,000 



25 Plants.. $ .60 

.85 

1.50 

2.15 

2.85 

3.50 

4.00 

7.00 

.33.75 

65.00 



or. 



Plants, 
Plants, 
Plants. 
Plants . 
Plants. 
Plants. 
Plants 
Plants. 
Plants. 



Plants. 

Plants. 

Plants. 

Plants. 

Plants. 

Plants. 

500 Plants. 

1,000 Plants. 

5,000 Plants. 

10,000 Plants. 



50 
100 
200 
3(X) 
400 



$ 1 
1 
2 
4 
5 



. 15 

. 70 
.150 



.00 
.50 
50 
.50 
.50 
..50 
.50 
.00 
00 
00 



From one to five thousand plants the 1,000 rate applies; from 
five thousand plants ap to 10.000 the 5,000 rate applies. 

LUCKY BOY and LUCKY STRIKE (Everbearing) 



12 Plants .$1.50 



25 
50 



Plants 2.50 

Plants 3.50 



KX) Plants 5.00 



250 Plants $ 10.00 

.500 Plants 15.00 

1,000 Plants 25.00 

5,000 Plants 100.00 



Late in season please give second choice. 



18 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



Descriptions of Other Small Fruits 



CURRANTS 

CHERRY.— (Red). Very large, deep red, bunch short, plant erect, 
stout, vigorous and productive. 

FAYS PROLIFIC— Large red, fine flavor, very large bunch. One 
of the leading red varieties, vigorous and productive. 



RED CROSS.-A large and pro- 
ductive variety. One of the best if not 
the best mid-season varieties on the mar- 
ket. Fruit mild and pleasant. One of 
our very best sellers. 

WILDER.-Large, bright red, at- 
tractive. Strong hardy grower, mid- 
season to late. 

LONDON MARKET.-Is said by 
a great many currant growers to be the 
best of a!l the red currants. Is a new 
variety, hardy and prolific, holds toliage 
late in season. 




VICTORIA.- 
old standards. 



RED CROSS CURRANTS 

-(Red). Large size and good quality. One of the 



PERFECTION.— This is truly a wonderful new currant. Large 
size and good quality. 

NOTE — As there is not much sale for Black Currants we have discontinued growing 
them. Our Currant bushes are al! two and three year old and very exceptional bargains 
at our price. 

GOOSEBERRIES 



^^\ '^'p^"^ 




DOWNING. Is con- 
sidered by most growers to 
be the best standard Goose- 
berry, and we are not grow- 
ing any other variety. Fruit 
is of a greenish yellow, good 
size, strong hardy grower, 
strickly high quality. 



DOWNING GOOSEBERRY 



TRUE-TO-NAME SMAEL FRUIT PLANTS 



19 



GRAPE VINES 



CONCORD. Decidedly 
the most popular Grape in 
America. Is more largely 
planted than all other grapes 
combinedl both for home 
use and market. A large 
purple black grape, extra 
large bunches, and high 
quality; does well in all sec- 
tions. A standard every- 
where. No home complete 
without a few Concord 
Gra[^e Vines. We have a 
fine stock, both i yr. and 
2 yr. vines. 

CLINTON. A strong, 
hardy grower, and especially 
adapted in the South; one 
of the best on light soil. 
Fruit medium in size, good 
quality. One of the old fav- 
orites for home use. 




DELAWARE. Bunch 
firm and juicy, very sweet. 



CONXORD GRAPE 

small, compact berries, small, thin skin, 
A pale red grape, and very popular. 

NIAGARA. Probably the best white grape, fruit large and sweet. 

MOORE'S EARLY. An extra early, good quality grape. Bun- 
ches very large, jet black. 

CAMPBELL'S EARLY. (Black). A very promising variety, 
size large, and good quality. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

(irape Vines, Raspberry Plants, Blackberry, Currants and all 
cane plants will be shipped separate from Strawberry Plant orders. 
They are not so perishable as strawberry plants and in large orders 
can be shipped by freight safely. However, if the order is small we 
will send either parcel post or express, collect. 

In ordering cane plants we will thank you to give second 
choice. All our cane stock is grown by one of the largest wholesale 
nurseries in the country and your orders for most of this stock will 
be filled direct from the nursery. We can ship any of these plants 
as late as May 15th providing we are not sold out. All this stock is 
fresh dug for your order. Xo st^orage stock carried in this nursery. 
Grape Vines may be shipped either from our nursery or from our 
branch in Ohio, whichever is most convenient to you. Ask for spec- 
ial prices on orders for ."),()()() up. 



20 



E. W TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



RASPBERRIES 



ST. REGIS. Ever- 
bearing. This red rasp- 
berry is probably the best 
of the everbearing rasp- 
berries for all sections, 
and especially for the 
South, and where the soil 
is light will produce from 
early summer until hard 
freezes. Not a full crop 
all the time, but in ordi- 
nary seasons there is no 
time when ripe fruit is 
not being produced. Is 
very fine quality and will 
please most growers. Ev- 
ery household should 
have a few plants. 

CUTHBERT. (Red). 
This is an old standard 
and a good variety. Does 
not fruit in the fall. 




ST REGIS EVER-BEARING RED RASPBERRY 




GOLD DOLLAR. A new seedling 
of great promise. Our attention was 
called to this variety by one of our 
friends who found it growing wild in 
an old family graveyard. The fruit while 
growing without any cultivation, was 
larger than any raspberry growing on 
the farm under cultivation, and was 
found to be very sweet and juicy. It 
was taken up and given proper attention 
and today is considered the very best 
raspberry in this section. The color is 
a rich golden yellow; as compared to 
Golden Queen, is much larger and more productive. We will sell only 
lo plants or less this season as we wish to keep most of our stock for 
propagation purposes. We want to sell just enough small lots to get 
it thoroughly introduced while we are propagating a large supply of 
plants to offer. Price, each $1.00. Not over 10 plants sold to a customer. 



#*'S^BB««I 



GOLD DOLLAR 
Yellow Raspberry 



TRUE-TO-NAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



21 



PRICE LIST OF GRAPE VINES 

And Other Small Fruits, Etc. 



RASPBERRY PLANTS. 



Each 



10 



50 

Plum Farmer (Blackcap) $.20 $1.75 $7.50 

St. Regis (red) E. B 20 1.75 7..50 

Cuthbert (red) 10 1.00 4.00 

Erskine Park (red) 20 1.75 7.50 

Golden Queen (yellow) 20 1.75 '7.50 

Gregg (black cap) 10 1.00 4.00 

Kansas (black cap) 10 1.00 4.00 

Royal Purple 20 1.75 7.00 

Honey Sweet (black cap) 80 2.00 9.00 

Hoosier ( black cap) 30 2.(K) 0.00 

Miller (red) 20 1.75 7.(»0 

Siiecial Price in Lots of 5,000 Up. 



100 

$12.00 

12.50 

7.00 

12.00 

12.00 

7.00 

7.00 

12.00 

15.00 

15.00 

12.00 



BLACKBERRY PLANTS— From Root Cuttings. 



Each 10 

Ancient Britton $ .20 $1.75 

Blowers 20 1.75 

Crystal White 30 2.50 

Eldorado 20 1.75 

Joy 30 2..50 

Merserau 20 1.75 

Hilalaya Giant 30 2.50 

Logan Berry — transplant 50 4.01) 

Lucretia Dewberry 10 1.75 

Austin Dewberry 10 1.75 



GRAPE VINES 



Concorn, 1 yr. No. 1 . . . 
Concord, 1 yr. No. 2 . . . 
Clinton, 2 yr. No. 1 . . . . 
Concord, 2 yr. No. 1 . . . 
Catawba, 2 yr. No. 1 . . . 
Campbell's Early, 1 yr. No 

Niagara, 2 yr. No. 1 , 

Niagara, 1 yr. No. 1 

Moore's Early, 2 yr. No. 1 , 



Each 
$ .25 
.20 
.25 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.25 
.30 



10 
.50 
.00 
.25 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.50 
.25 
.50 



CURRANTS. 



Cherry Red, 3 yr. No. 1 . 

Victoria, 3 yr. No. 1 

Fay's, 3 yr. No. 1 

Perfection, 1 yr. No. 1 . . . 
London Market, 1 yr. No. 

Wilder, 2 yr. No. i 

Red Cross, 1 yr. No. 1 . . , 
White Grape, 2 yr. No. 2 



Each 
$ .40 
, .40 

.40 
, .25 

.25 
, .30 
. .25 
, .40 



10 
$3.50 
3..50 
3.50 
2.25 
2.25 
2.50 
2.25 
3.50 



50 
$ 7.50 

7..50 
10.00 

7.50 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
15.00 

5.00 

5.00 



50 
$10.00 
0.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
10.00 
12.00 



50 
$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
10.00 
15.00 



TOO 

$12.00 

12.00 

17.50 

12.00 

17.50 

12.00 

17.50 

25.00 

7.50 

7.50 



100 
$17.50 
15.00 
17.50 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
2().(>0 
17.50 
20.(X) 



100 
525.00 
25.00 
25.00 
17.50 
17.50 
20.00 
17.50 
25.00 



1000 
$75.00 

40.00 
65.00 
()5.00 
40.00 
40.00 
65.00 



65.00 



1000 
; 65.00 

65.00 
100.00 

65.00 
100.00 

65.00 
100.00 

25.00 
25.00 



1000 
$150.00 
100.00 
100.00 
175.00 
175.00 
175.00 
175.00 
175.00 
175.00 



1000 



22 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



PRICE LIST OF SMALL FRUITS--(Continued) 
GOOSE BERRY. 

Each 10 50 100 1000 
Do^Yning, 2 yr. No. 1 $ .40 $3.50 $15.00 $25.00 



ASPARAGUS ROOTS. 

Colossal, Bars Mam, Giant Argeutile, 1 yv $1.50 $12.50 



Less than 10 at each rate, less than 50 at 10 rate, less than 
100 at 50 rate, less than 500 at 100 rate, 500 at 1,000 rate. 




This cut shows a field of PAN-AMERICAN BLACKBERRY PLANTS in fruit. Without 
exception this is the most wonderful Blackberry ever introduced to the pubUc. A sin- 
gle plant will produce more than fifty quarts of berries m a season This grand variety 
hails from South America. Is extremely hardy and a strong grower, fruit as large as 
the very largest blackberry known, firm and very sweet, has very few seeds. Fruits a 
long season, in fact produces from the very earliest to the very latest of the blackberry 
season. We have made arrangements with the party who received these plants direct 
from South America, to introduce them to the public, and expect to hear great things 
from this berry in a few years. Anyone particularly interested, we shall be pleased to 
give the address where the plants can be seen growing and fruiting this summer. 

There is only 15,000 plants offered for sale this year at a price 
of $1.00 each. Not less than five plants sold. 



DON'T FAIL TO ORDER A FEW PAN-AMERICAN 
BLACK BERRY. 



TRUE-TO-NAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 23 



ROSE BUSHES. 

Strong field grown (winter hardened) two and three year, 18 to 20 

inches. Prices, 75c each ; five, $3.00 ; 10, $5.00. Please give 

second choice. 

Baltimore Bell Seven Sisters 

C'rinii^on Rambler White Dorothy 

Dorthy Perkins Wichurina 

Cherokee Yellow Rambler 

(iold Finch Mrs. Harding (a new pink Ram- 

Hi watha bier) $2.00 each. 

Lady Gay French Queen, $2.00 each. 

Prairie Queen 

Rose bushes can be shipped by parcel post, as follows : 
Five pieces or less, 10c each postage ; six to ten pieces, 7c each 
postage; over ten pieces, 5c each pstage. 



SHORT DESCRIPTIONS OF ROSES 

BALTIMORE BELL— Double blush white. 

CRIMSON RAMBLERS— Delicate flesh white flowers, large 
in tine cutiug clusters. 

DOROTHY PERKINS — Dense clusters of double pink flow- 
ers, fluted pedels. 

GOLD FINCH— Buds rich lemon yellow, open flowers a trifle 
lighter. 

HIAWATHA — Deep ruby crimson, with white eye, small 
flowers, big clusters. 

LADY GAY — Cherry pink and white. 

PRAIRIE QUEEN— Bright rosy red. 

SEVEN SISTERS— Crimson and white. 

WICHURIANA (Memorial Rose)— Single white flowers, lus- 
trous foliage. 

WHITE DOROTHY— Best white climbing. 

MRS. HARDING — A beautiiul new pink rambler, strong 
grower and sets heavy wi.h foliage, and the most beautiful clusters 
of rich, pink flowers. Price $2.00 each. 

FRENCH QUEEN — A new one from France, beautiful red 
climber, unsurpassed for beauty. Price $2.00 each. 



SPECIAL. 

Our lady customers will be pleased to note that we have added 
a fine selection of roses to our list. 

We have a Rose Specialist only a few miles from our nursery 
who is growing these very fine roses for us and who will be more 
than pleased to make a selection for you and to help you in any way 
possible to obtain the very best collection for your locality. 

Our prices are based on strickly first class stock grown in 
open fields and winter hardened. Rose bushes can be shipped by pur- 
eel post. 



24 E. W TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 

Townsend's Strawberry Gardens 

FOR 1922 



Townssnd's Everbearing Garden 

This garden will fruit from July until the snow flies, the first 
year plants are set. And again next Spring and continue during 
the second fall. This garden is composed of 

100 Progressive or 100 Lucky Boy 

100 Superb 100 Lucky Strike 

Oor Special Price by parcel post prepaid is only $15.00. 

Don't fail to order this collection and save your postage bill. 



Townieud's Big 4 Standard Garden 

These four varieties are without a doubt the three best Stan- 
dard varieties ever introduced, and of the very finest quality. 
Suitable for home use, or market, and will give you berr'es in the 
Spring over a long season. This garden is composed of 

100 Premier 100 Townsend Big Late 

100 Ford 100 Dr. Burrill 

Our Special Price by parcel post prepaid is only $6.00. 

Our customers save the parcel post charges on this Big Four 
Garden. 



Our Boys' and Girls' Garden 

We always try to do something extra for the Boys and Girls. 
This time we are going to give them the best bargain they ever 
had, will send 500 plants of our own selection which will include 
fifty ever bearing most suitable for their locality at the very low 
price of $5.00 prepaid. A saving of at least of $2.50 on this 
garden. 



Townsend's Big 6 Special 

We furnish more than 500 of these Gardens during season 
1920. And received some wonderful reports from them this sum- 
mer. In fact they have pleased every one who purchased them. 
This collections includes the following. 

100 Premier 100 Lucky Boy, Everbearing 

100 Dr. Burrill 100 Ford 

100 Haverland 100 Townsend Big Late 

We furnished more than 500 of these Gardens during season 
Every one a strickly high class variety and hardy grower. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 25 



Townsend's Special Market Garden No. 1 

1000 Premier, Catalogue price $ 7.00 

1000 Sen. Dunlap, Catalogue price 5.00 

1000 Missionary. Catalogue price 5.00 

1000 Big Joe, Catalogue price 7.00 

24.00 
Special price only, purchaser to pay transportation charges, $22.00. 



Townsend*s Special Market Garden No. 2 

ONE ACRE COLLECTION. 

2000 Dr. Burrill, Catalogue price $10.00 

20O0 Missionary, Catalogue price - 10.00 

2000 Haverland, Catalogue price 14.00 

2000 Foi-a, Catalogue price 14.00 

$48.00 
Special price, purchaser to pay charges, only $40.00. 

A saving of $5.00 on tins order. 



Our New England Garden No. 3 

HALF ACRE COLLECTION. 

500 I*remier, Catalogue price $ 4.00 

500 Dr. Burrill, Catalogue price 3.O0 

500 Townsend Big Late, Catalogue price 4.00 

500 Ford, Catalogue price 4.00 

500 Lupton, Catalogue price 4.00 

500 Glen Mary, Catalogue price 4.00 

1000 Everbearing, Catalogue price 15.00 

$38.00 
Our Special price, purchaser to pay charges, only $35.00. 

A saving of $8.00 on lliis order. 



Townsend's Half Acre Everbearing Collection 

Will pay for itsself several times over this season if given a 
proper chance. Includes 1000 each of our best ever bearing. 

1000 Luck Boy 1000 Progressive 

1003 Lucky Strike 1000 Super "j 

Our Special price, purchaser to pay charges, only $60.00 

Catalogue price $80.00 

A saving of $20.00 on this order and you get the best ever 
bearing collection in the world. 



26 E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



Townssnd's Mixed Small Fruit Collection No. 10 

PURCHASER TO PAY CHARGES. 

3 Grape Vines, red, white and blue, value $ .90 

3 Gooseberry, Downing, value 1.20 

3 Red Raspberry, everbearing, value 60 

3 Black Raspberry, value .60 

3 Yellow Raspberry, value 60 

3 Blackberry, value 60 

3 Red Currants, value 1.20 

3 Black Currants, value 1.20 

3 White Currants, value 1.20 

100 Best Standard Strawberry, value 1.50 

100 Best Everybearing, value 5.00 

Catalouge value $14.60 

Our special price only $12.50, a savfcg of $2.10. 

The above collection will be prepared by an experienced nur- 
seryman and satisfaction is guaranteed. This is the first time we are 
able to ofi'er such a small fruit garden, and we hope that you will 
take advantage of this special offer. 



Townsend's Mixed Small Fruit Garden No. 20 
FOR COMMERCIAL USE, CONSISTS OF 

100 St. Regis Everbearing Raspberry, value $12.00 

100 Cuthbery, Red Raspberry 7.00 

200 Plum Farmer Black Raspberry 25.00 

200 Best Market Variety Blackberry 25.00 

25 Two Year No. 1 Concord Grape 5.00 

25 Niagaria White Grape 6.00 

50 Red Cross Currants, two year. No. 1 15.00 

50 London Market, one year, No. 1 10.00 

25 Downing Gooseberry, two year. No. 1 15.00 

500 Strawberry Plants, best standards 4.50 

500 Everybearing Strawberry Lucky Boy 15.00 

Cataogue price value $139.50 

Special price, purchaser to pay charges, $125.00, a saving of $14.50 
on this splendid order. 

SPECIAL — We will send one-half of the above collection for 
$65.00, or twice the amount for only $210.00. 



Note — Every collection will be filled as described as long as the 
variety is in list. Should we run short on some varieties we re- 
serve the right to fill the order with something that we know to 
be of equal value. We do not sell one half of a collection at half 
the price quoted. We should not be asked to do this as we have 
truly given Bargain prices. And promise to please all who order 
our Garden selections as we have done in the past. 



TRUE-TO-NAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 27 



M >IBER OF PLANTS REQUIRED TO SET AN ACRE AT * 
GIVEN DISTANCE APART. 

Rows 24 nches apart plants 12 inch in row 20,000 
Rows 30 inches apart plants 12 inch in row 17,000 
Rows 36 inches apart plants 12 inch in row 14,000 
Rows 42 inches apart plants 12 inch in row 12,000 
Rows 36 inches apart plants 18 inch in row 9,500 
Rows 42 inches apart plants 18 inch in row 8,000 
Rows 48 nches apart i)lan's 18 inch in row 7,000 
Rows 48 inches apart plants 24 inch in row 5,500 
Rows 24 inches apart plants 24 inch in row 11,000 
Rows 30 inches apart plants 30 inch in row 7,000 

For hill culture rows should be either 24 inches, 30 inches or 30 
inches and plants set 12 inch in the row. 

For matted row syslem rows should be either 42 inches or 48 
inches and plants set 18 inch to 24 inch in row. 



PARCEL POST RATES ON STRAWBERRY PLANTS. 

Zone 1 and 2 — Figure 10c per lOO plants or less. 

Zone 3 — Figure 15c per 100 plants. 

Zone 4 — Figure 20c per 100 plants. 

Zone 5 — Figure 25c per 100 plants. 

Zone 6 — Figure 30c per 100 plants. 

Zone 7 — Figure 35c per 100 plants. 

Zone 8 — Figure 40c per 100 plants. 

This table has been very carefully prepared and after filling 
hundreds of thousands of orders, and we believe it to be as correct as 
it is possible to get it. Plants do not all weigh the same when packed 
for shipment and no table could prove correct. We do not try to 
adjust small differences in postage. This rate will apply to all or- 
ders received to go by parcel post prepaid; and when not sufficien' 
postage is remitted as per table above we will send plants C. O. D. 
postage, and return whatever amount you have sent us for postage. 

3c will insure you order up to $5.00. 
5c will insure your order up to $10.00. 

We use light ventilated crates and patented mailing cartoons in 
shipping parcel post. 



More Praise For The Dr. Burrill 

MR. GEO. WELCH, of Ind., writes he made a profit of $1815.00 
per acre from Dr. Burrill on very poor soil. 

MR. JOHN H. PALTZ, of Mass., says Dr. Burrll was mv best 
berry the past season netting- me more than $2100.00 off'thr.e 
quarters of an acre. 



28 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



Impossible to Fill The Demand For Townsend's 
High-Grade Plants 



Every year we have increased our acre- 
age. And every year we have more un- 
filled orders. We have grown more than 
300 acres for our 1922 crop, but we do not 
expect to be able to fill the orders again 
this season. We have just purchased 170 
acres more of the finest strawberry land 
on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. We 
are preparing this land now for our 1923 
crop of plants. This added acreage will 
only partly fill the demand for our plants. 

The big seed houses of the Country 
would take alone every plant we can grow 
every year to fill their orders. Our prices 



to them are just the same as to our regular 
customers who send to us direct. It can 
thus be seen that people will pay even twice 
or three times as much as we ask for our 
plants in order to get them. 

The seed houses usually ask about twice 

to three times as much for plants as we 

charge for them. Most of these orders 

are filled direct to the growers from our 

j packing houses under our own tag, and the 

seed house customers know whose plants 

: they are using. This helps to create a 

\ great demand for Townsend's plants thru 

j this source as our plants always adver- 

I tise themselves. 



Big Brewing Business of Pennsylvania 
go in the Nursery Business. 

April 23, 1921. 
Berry plants arrived O. K. Find check 
for $200.00 for more plants. 

Lion Brewing Co. 

Townsend's Plants and Townsend's 
Service. 

R. I., June 30, 1921. 
Just finished my half acre of berries, net- 
ted me $1378.60, what do you think of this 
for a starter? I am expecting to double 
this next season when my Premier comes 
into bearing. Townsend's plants and 
Townsend's service for me. 

L. E. C. 

From a small Townsend garden we pick- 
ed 320 quarts for our grocer, he paid us 40 
cents per quart, and we had all the deli- 
cious berries we could use for four weeks. 
Had only 300 plants. This was your girl's 
garden selection. 

Mary Thomas (111.) 

The strawberry plants came O. K., I have 
them set out and they look fine. I want to 
thank you for the fine plants. 

Alice Murry (N. H.). 

Walnut Grove Sanatorium. 

The strawberry plants arrived O. K. and 
are looking fine. If you ever come to 
Springfield, Mass., I would be pleased to 
have you call. I live seven miles from 
Forest Park. 

Mrs. A. H. Newman. 

A Pleased Customer. 

We got an order of strawberry plants 
from you people which amounted to 14,000 
plants. The plants were very fine. Am 
very well pleased with them. 

Clarence Kepple (Pa.). 

Townsend's plants have done wonderful 
for us. We are Townsend boosters. You 
have received many orders that we have 
thrown your way. We have tried plants 
from all over the Country but nothing as 
good as Townsend's plants here. 

John Figgs (Mass.). 



Sent across the Continent and as Fresh 
as when dug. 

The plants got here on the 20th and they 
were as fresh as when dug. There was not 
one of them bad. Never saw such fine 
plants. I got some from a neighbor of 
yours and they were half rotten. I have or- 
dered a lot of plants from all parts of the 
Country but yours beat them all. 

O. A. Coye (Texas). 

I think that nearly every one in this sec- 
tion uses Townsend's plants. We have 
been using them for years and have always 
been a Townsend booster. We have only 
a small bed in our garden but would not 
be without a garden of strawberries for 
nothing in the world. Pays for itself many 
times over each year. Send us 600 more 
Premier plants and 100 Lucky Boy. These 
are our choice varieties. 

Mrs. J. J. S. (Pa.). 

Replying to yours of the 1st inst. as to 
how we like the Premier, will say Premier 
is the only berry for us. We expect to set 
10 acres to it this Spring and will give you 
our order a little later as we are making up 
a 50,000 order in order to get them for $7.00 
per 1,000. Reserve this many for us, we 
will surely take them. 

J. A. H. (Alabama). 

The plants you sent me are doing fine, 
have lost but very few. The World's 
Wonder are the finest plants I ever saw. 
I am more than pleased. Wishing you 
every success in your honest business way. 
These days it is hard to find honest business 
men but there are still some. I am glad to 
say. 

Ralph B. Hill (Conn,). 

Gentlemen: — The 1,000 plants ordered 
from you on the 11th arrived in fine shape 
on the 14th. In speed for filling orders 
this "caps the climax." Many thanks 
for your promptness. I assure you I ap- 
preciate this kind of service. — Yours truly 
F. G. McCollum (N. Y.). 

Plants came duly at hand and certainly 
look good. 

Mm. G. Claxton (N. Y.). 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



29 




This is E. W. T., Jr., photographed in one of our fields of Premier. He is the fellow who 
superintends the packing of your orders, and from the thousands of letters we receive 
complimenting him on his packing and good count, we suppose he knows his business 
prettv well. Jr's. never satisfied unless you are satisfied. 



THE RURAL NEW YORKER, 
333 West 30th Street, New York. 

June 2, 1921. 
E. W. Townsend & Son, 

My Dear Mr. Townsend: — I think you 
may be interested in the nice report we 
received from your customer, Oliver E. 
Woodmacy, of Randolph, X. J., which 
reads as follows: "I want to mention the 
honesty and courteous treatment we re- 
ceived by the Townsend Company, straw- 
berry shippers. In March I sent to them 
and they made a mistake and sent to the 
wrong address. By the time they arrived 
here two weeks later they were a worthless 
lot of plants. I wrote them and promptly 
they sent another lot of splendid plants." 

I trust the plant season has proved a 
good one for you, and remain with best 
wishes. — \'er>' sincerelv yours 
The R. X. Y. 
W.F.D.— R. WM. F. Dillon. 



Chaney, Md., May 16th. 1921. 

Mess. E. W. T. & Son: — I am enclosing 
check for balance due you. I am shipping 
a few Premier berries, have been getting 
$12.00 per thirty-two quart crate. Will 
have about 25 crates to-day. They are 
the prettiest berries that I have ever seen. 
With kindest regards, I am 

J. C. 

Note. — Mr. C. and his friends came over 
to our nursery in the Spring and placed a 
veri" large order for plants. We recom- 
mended Premier and Ford varieties. Now 
they are pleased. 



The only thing I regretted this Spring 
was that I did not take your advice and set 
all Premier plants. Half acre Premier 
sold for more money than one and three 
quarters acres in other varieties. 

West Laurens (N. Y.). 



30 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



YOU WILL FIND TOWNSEND CUSTOMERS IN 

EVERY NOOK AND CORNER OF 

THE COUNTRY 



We receive every year hundreds of or- 
ders from the leading institutions thruout 
the Country. State institutions, state 
hospitals, boys' and girls' clubs and ex- 
periment stations everywhere. County 
agents are always praising our plants. 
Thousands of orders are received thru rec- 
ommendations of state officials on the mer- 
its of Townsend's plants alone. The whole 
Country is our field. We have satisfied 
customers everj'where. 

A trial order in a remote section often 
leads in a few years to a large trade in that 
territory. That any product will succeed 
everywhere, must have a superior quality. 
Townsend's plants have accomplished this 



Want to thank you for the nice plants 
and liberal count. Everything just fine. 
I should have written sooner but will do 
better next time. 

Mrs. F. Townsend (N. J.). 

Plants ordered on the 24th arrived on 
the 28th in very fine shape and best plants 
I ever saw. And again I want to thank 
you for the liberal count. I am certainly 
well pleased. 

Wm. Fryer ( N.J.). 

Townsend Nursery: — Wish to thank 
you for the nice plants I have just receiv- 
ed. It is nice to deal with square people. 
W. A. Leonard (N. Y.) . 

Here is the 13th order to you for plants. 
I feel that this one will be a lucky order as 
all others have been. You have never 
failed to send us good plants, and I never 
fail to recommend Townsend where ever 
I go, 

J. H. Snyder (Mass.). 

Received my plants. Your Premier 
are the largest strawberry plants and best 
rooted plants I have ever seen. Please 
mail another copy of your book, I want it 
for a friend. 

H. H. Longfield (Mich.). 



because they have made good everywhere. 
To a degree that has left no room in our 
customer's minds to doubt. 

Our Plants and Service the Same 
To All. 

Townsend Plants and Townsend service 
means the same to every one. This means 
the best plants it is possible to grow. Ful- 
ly selected and true to name. Packed so 
as to reach you in good growing condition. 
A truthful statement about everything. 
Only square deal methods used. We al- 
ways have in mind that your success means 
ours. And if for no other reason, a square 
honest deal is the only business way. 



Plants arrived at the proper time. Were 
a real bunch of plants. You have my con- 
fidence as a grower. — I am vours trulv 

Robt. E. Schrucker (Pa.). 

Plants arrived O. K. Please send cata- 
logue to friend, I told him about you. 

W. M. Burrill (N. Y.). 

A Repeater. 

Plants arrived this A. M. Am very 
much pleased. Find inclosed another or- 
der. After reading your book I have de- 
cided to send you another order. 

A. L. Rhodes (Conn.). 

Gentlemen: — Plants just arrived in fine 
shape. Am well pleased. I had some or- 
dered from another nurseryman in Kansas. 
His were a poor lot of trash, 75% were no 
good. I will throw most of them away. 
Such stock would be dear as a gift. I am 
sending you another order with this letter 
and beg to remain, yours very truly 

Adolph Bading (Texas). 

Plants all arrived O. K. and am well 
pleased. 

Harold M. Yates (Conn.). 

Plants arrived in fine shape, have them 
planted out and every one living. Inclos- 
ed find order for 1,000 more plants. 

F. G. M. (N. Y.). 



THE BIG 3 


PREMIER 

FORD 

TOWNSEND'S BIG LATE 



TRUE-TO-NA^rE SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



31 



OUR SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



We do not consider the deal closed when 
we accept your money and ship you your or- 
der of plants. We are here to guide you in 
giving advice and in helping you in every 
way possible in grov, ing and marketing the 
crop. More than one-half of the time of 
the writer is spent is correspondence with 
his customers in advising them in the dif- 
ferent problems in growing their crops and 
in making selections. 

In this booklet we are trying to give all 
the advice possible as to selecting varie- 
ties, manuring, plowing, setting plants and 
caring for them from start to finish — in or- 
der to avoid so much unnecessary corres- 
pondence as possible, during the coming 
very busy season. But any advice not 
given here will be cheerfully given for the 
asking. 

WE COULD GROW JUST STRAW- 
BERRY PLANTS. 

Just such plants as are grown and adver- 
tised by the average plant man. But 
would we grow ourselves? 

We think not. We have seen the com- 
ing and the going of a great many plant 
growers since we started in the business. 

We would not be content to grow 
just Strawberry Plants. 

Our one aim is to grow only the very 
best plants that it is possible to grow. And 
to make every Townsend customer a lead- 
er in his section as a successful strawberry 
grower. 

For this reason it is to the interest of 
every berry grower large or small to select 
Townsend as his or her Nurseryman to sup- 
ply the plants for this year's crop. Mis- 
takes and failures are fatal at this time, we 
must not take chances and buy something 
called plants just because they happen to 
be a little cheaper or a little nearer home. 
Our packing is perfect. No matter where 
situated plants should reach you in time, 
at the proper season — our prices are as 
cheap as the best plants can be grown and 
delivered to you. 

Once a Townsend Customer — al- 
ways a Townsend Customer — WHY? 

The first thought with us when we get a 
new customer is to try to please him better 
than he was ever pleased before. We be- 
gin by serving him with better plants than 
he was ever accustomed to. We give him 
prompter service than he is used to. We 
never allow a customer to make a mistake 
in getting the wrong varieties if we can help 
it. We are never too busy to sit down and 
write our customer a letter advising him 
about his order. We try to give every 
customer a little more than he expects, 
(note what some of them say when writing 
us). We do not treat a customer in the 
above manner just when he is new but we 
try to give him better service every time 
he comes back. 



V» HEN THE ORDER IS RECEIVED. 

When an order is received, first it is hand- 
ed to our manager. He reads the order 
and letter over (if accompanied by letter), 
fifty per cent, of the orders sent to us is left 
to the Manager's own way to fill, as he 
thinks best. Twenty-five per cent, of the 
orders state: if the varieties ordered are not 
suited for my section, please substitute 
something better. The Manager at once 
takes his pencil and crosses out any variety 
not suited; or if left entirely to him tc make 
selections, makes out the order with our 
very best varieties for the particular sec- 
tion, adding a few more plants than the 
customer expected or paid for. The order 
goes at once to the Packing House, where 
it is booked for shipment on a certain day. 
The foreman there instructs the book-keep- 
er to add a few extras. Next the packer 
gets the order in hand to fill. He gives in- 
structions for digging the order and prepar- 
ing same for shipment. When plants are 
counted (after giving two or three plants 
over in each bundle) the packer finds he 
has a few bundles over, he places them in 
the shipment also, as he says no use to leave 
them over, we will make him feel good 
when the box is opened. So it goes; every 
one who has a crack at the order tries to do 
a little more than he is required to do in or- 
der to make the customer happy. 

We have no favorites. Every customer 
is extended the same treatment whether 
the order is a dollar or a five hundred dollar 
order. In short we could not ask any one 
of our customers to give us more for our 
money than we give them, if our positions 
were reversed. 



More Money in an Acre of Townsend's 
Plants than half a Farm in other crops. 

Penn., March 1st, 1921. 
Gents: — I am thinking of setting two 
acres of strawberry plants this Spring, and 
would not think of setting any except 
Townsend's plants. I have seen them 
growing here in Bucks County for ten years. 
The folks are making more money on an 
acre of Townsend's strawberries than I am 
making on half my farm in other crops. I 
cannot stand it any longer. Make me a 
good selection for two acres and send bill 
and I will mail you check at once to cover. 
F. Fleming. 

111., Sept. 5th, 1921. 

E. W^ T. & Son: — I am writing to let 

you know of the fine lot of plants received 

from you this Spring. We have 99% of a 

stand. Many thanks, will come again. 

C. M. 



One from a Large Nursery in N. J. 

Inclosed find check for $7S6.U0 as per 
invoice. We had no kick with the plants, 
they were very nice and we hope to favor 
you with some orders from time to time. — 
Respt. 

A. J. C. 



32 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



CULTURAL DIRECTIONS 



Strawberries will thrive in almost any 
soil that is not too dry or water-soaked, and 
no crop will respond more quickly to good 
cultivation than the Strawberry. Straw- 
berries require a great deal of moisture, es- 
pecially at fruiting time. 

PREPARING THE SOIL.— Strawber- 
ries should follow some truck crop if possi- 
ble. We do not recommend planting 
strawberries after an old sod has been turn- 
ed under, too many grubs are likely to des- 
troy the plants. All sod land should be 
plowed at least a year in advance and sow- 
ed to some v'ne crop and manured the fall 
or winter before planting to strawberries, 
and then thoroughly worked up in the 
spring, where it is possible; land that has 
been manured a year in advance makes the 
best strawberries. We do not recommend 
heavy application of manure immediately 
before planting, and under no circum- 
stances do we recommend the use of com- 
mercial fertilizer, directly under the plants 
when set. The fertilizer is likely to cause 
the plants to die as soon as the sun gets hot. 
If fertilizer is to be used, broadcast on the 
land, thoroughly work in the land a few 
weeks before ,=:etting plants. The finer 
the condition of the soil at planting time 
the better for the crop. If land is hard and 
cloddy, better roll, also if very loose sandy, 
it is best to roll, as this rolling holds the 
moisture that is so much needed at this 
time. 

TIME TO PLANT.— The fall from No- 
vember 1st to March 30th in the South 
plants may be set any time. In the Mid- 
dle States, March and first half of April. 
In the North, as early in the Spring as the 
ground can be worked, the sooner the bet- 
ter. Northern customers should always 
order their plants shipped at least two 
weeks before they expect to set them out. 
The plants should be healed in a V-shaped 
trench after they have been unpacked and 
untied, bunches opened and roots dipped 
in water. Cover with a board to shade the 
plants and tliey will keep several weeks and 
be in fine condition to plant when the prop- 
er day arrives. We ship most orders to the 
far North during the last half of April. But 
some of our wisest customers order plants 
shipped during August and September, we 
have as good plants at this time as any one 
in the business, but we cannot recommend 
the planting at this time, and do not see 
where the gain is in August planting in the 
North. Everbearing plants set in April 
will fruit just as quick as the August and 
September plants, and much less trouble 
and expense. 

SETTING PLANTS AND MARKING 
OUT THE ROWS. 

After ground is in perfect condition mark 
rows out with any kind of light marker, that 
will not make too much of a sink in the 
ground. 

IF HILL SYSTEM.— Mark rows 30 
inches apart one way and fifteen inches the 
other and set plants in the check with a 



spade or trowel, being sure to get roots 
down straight and fan shaped, firming 
ground around plants hard with the hand 
or foot. Some customers write us they 
water the plants when settin'g them. Don't 
Do That! Nothing could be more injur- 
ious to the strawberry plant. Under this 
system, all runner plants are kept cut off 
and only the plant you set is allowed to 
grow. Plants grown this way grow to be 
very large and usually meet the 15 inch 
way, and produce more quarts of berries 
per acre than the latter named system. It 
is easy to grow one quart of berries per 
plant under this system. Fruit will aver- 
age twice as large and sell for more money 
in the markets. We recommend the hill 
system, as so many of our customers have 
reported such large yields from their fields. 

SINGLE HEDGE ROWS.— Mark rowa 
thirty inches one way, and set plants twen- 
ty inches apart and allow each plant to 
make about two to four plants. Some 
very fine berries can be grown this way. 

DOUBLE HEDGE ROWS.— For dou- 
ble hedge rows, mark rows thirty-six inches 
one way, two rows of plants are set zig zag 
fashion, and each plant is allowed to make 
only a few plants. The object of the dou- 
ble hedge row is to get more fruit to the 
acre than by the single hedge row. The 
center of the bed is kept open so as to give 
the plants air and sun. This is one of the 
intensive systems and requires much more 
work than the other ways, and should not 
be practiced on a large scale. 

THE NARROW MATTED ROW.— 

Mark rows forty inches apart one way, set 
plants eighteen to twenty-four inches apart 
and allow to grow until row is as wide as 
desired and then keep down by cutting 
runners off the balance of the season. Usu- 
ally ten inches is the desired width. This 
is probably the most common system of 
growing berries in the large commercial 
growing sections, where fancy fruit is not 
the particular object. Too many plants 
should never be allowed to mat in the bed 
as their growth is only at the expense of 
the former plants and when such crowd- 
ing is allowed small berries and small yields 
may be expected. One acre grown in the 
proper way is worth at least two grown 
the wrong way. It takes a strong robust 
plant to make a productive plant, it must 
have plenty of room and moisture, 'f the 
roots are crowded moisture will be lacking. 
If one is not particular about neither qual- 
ity or quantity, strawberries will generally 
grow with as little attention as any other 
crop. But we always contend that any- 
thing that is worth growing is worth grow- 
ing right, and advise our customers to get 
all there is in it by using the proper meth- 
ods. The large crops are produced when 
grown in hills and cultivated each way, one 
way with horse, if in commercial lots, and 
the narrow way with hoe or wheel hoe. If 
for garden purposes, plants may be set 12x24 
inches and worked with wheel hoe and give 
the largest yield. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



33 




The above cut shows the 1 o vnsend way to handle plants when they are received and 
you are not ready to set plants for several days. Plants nicely heeled in 
can be kept for weeks. 



CULTURAL DIRECTIONS 

(Continued from page 32) 

MATING VARIETIES. This para- 
graph should be especially noted by all. 

Strawberry plants are divided into two 
sexes, male and female, or perfect and im- 
perfect blossoms as the varieties are listed 
in our books. The perfect flowering sorts 
will produce as well without the imperfect 
flowering sorts, but should you plant all 
imperfect sorts, you would have indeed a 
very poor crop, if any crop at all. Most 
catalogue writers recommend planting per- 
fect varieties of the same season, with the 
imperfect sorts, same rows of each, or two 
rows of perfect flowering to three or four 
imperfect and so on across the field or gar- 
den. 

For best results we have found that 
where the most is to be gotten from an im- 
perfect variety, (and indeed they are our 
very best producers when properly mated), 
is to set an imperfect variety between two 
different perfect varieties, on one side 
should be a perfect variety that opens 
blooms a few days in advance of the im- 
perfect sort, and on the other side a per- 
fect sort that will continue to bloom until 
after the blooming of the imperfect sort. 
When a trio of this sort is set, you are sure 



of getting fertilization for all blooms of the 
imperfect sorts, hence the larger crop to be 
expected and more uniform shape berries. 
Let us illustrate. Commence by setting 
two rows of Dr. Burrill, four rows of Kel- 
logg Prize, and two rows of Chesapeake, 
and continue across the patch in this man- 
ner. If other cultural methods are follow- 
ed success is sure with the above varieties. 
We shall at all times be pleased to make the 
selections of the perfect sorts when imper- 
fect varieties are wanted, for main crop. 

REMOVING BLOSSOMS (Very Im- 
portant). 

All strawberry plants whether standards 
or ever bearing begin to blossom very soon 
after being set in the Spring, and these 
blossoms should be removed as soon as 
they are all open by cutting off the fruit 
stems with a sharp knife or shears. Noth- 
ing weakens a plant more than letting the 
fruit ripen on it when it is young. 

It requires but a few hours to remove 
the blossoms from an acre and that will 
mean your success in growing a strong, 
healthy crop of plants that will prove fruit- 
ful the following crop. 

Most of the ever bearing sorts require 
the removing of blossoms about twice dur- 
ing the first season before berries should be 
allowed to ripen. Aside from this fact ever 



34 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



CULTURAL DIRECTIONS 1 

(Continued from page 33) 

bearing strawberries are given the same i 
care and cultivation as other standard \ 
varieties. 

CULTIVATING AND HOEING. 

The Cultivators should start soon after ' 
plants are set and given often and shallow 
cultivation the entire growing season. Al- 
ways remember the shallow cultivation, ; 
nothing is more injurious to a plant than ' 
deep cultivation. The light, shallow cul- 
tivation keeps a dust mulch around the 
plants which is so essential in dry weather, 
and the roots should never be disturbed 
by either hoe or cultivator. , 

AS TO SPRAYING.— This is left en- 
tirely to our customers. They can get bet- 
ter advice from their State Colleges, than 
we can give; every locality has its own in- 
dividual troubles with insects. (We are i 



thankful that we have no plant insects on 
the Eastern Shore of Maryland). Neither 
do we have to mulch our plants in winter 
in order to save them from freezing. But 
in the very cold sections of the country 
where Mulch is necessary, we recommend 
straw manure if possible, if not convenient, 
any kind of straw, Marsh grass, shredded 
corn stalks, may be used and removed in 
the early spring before new growth starts. 
This mulch should be raked off and left 
between the rows as a protector to the 
coming fruit crop. As to the length of 
time a strawberry bed should be allowed 
to stand depends on the care given to it. 
We have reports that beds have been kept 
up for six years and given bumper crops, 
sometimes producing more fruit the third 
and fourth year than the first season. Keep- 
ing up old patches requires a great deal of 
work, more so than renewing with a new 
bed at least every two years. Old beds are 
given practically the same care as new beds 
in first year. The ground must be kept 
constantly cultivated and all the weeds 
kept out. 



TESTIMONIALS FROM A TO Z. 



For twenty years the writer of this book, 
has been encouraging the growing of family 
strawberry beds. Probably not half who 
have read my story year after year, have 
been influenced enough to make the start. 
But enough encouragement has been re- 
ceived by me, that I shall never stop the 
work that I have begun as long as I am able 
to write a catalogue. That I have done 
some good you will see by the following ex- 
tracts from letters received from all over 
the Country. 

ALABAMA. — We are picking berriej. 
this year from the beds of plants we bough. 
of you three years ago. The initial cos 
of plants was $5.00 to say nothing of the 
berries we have used in our home we have 
sold more than $50.00 worth of berries to 
Our neighbors every year. We owe it all 
to Townsend service. 

ARKANSAS. — Several years ago we 
purchased some Progressive ever bearing 
plants from you. They did so well that 
we have never stopped growing them. Has 
been the best investment we ever made. No 
one at the time we purchased these plants 
from you knew anything about ever bear- 
ing strawberries in this section and today 
every family for miles around has them 
growing in their gardens. All this came 
about through your recommendation of the 
family garden. We owe you a great deal 
of credit. 



ALASKA. — When we came here we nev- 
er expected to get any more fresh straw- 
berries from the vines. But today we are 
picking as fine berries from the plants you 
sent us as we ever saw in Ohio. 

ARIZONA.— Have just finished pick- 
ing last berries from our garden. We have 
sold more than $200 worth and have plenty 
stored for winter and they come again. _lt 
is the most profitable crop we have ever 
grown. Many thanks to you. 

ARIZONA.— The Ford plants produced 
as fine quality berries as the Marshall, and 
about four times as many berries. I en- 
close order for more plants. 

CALIFORNIA.— It is a pleasure to 
grow your plants. We have ordered plants 
from all sections, but never got any to 
grow like Townsend 's. 

CANAL ZONE.— Plants arrived in fine 
shape and are growing nicely. 

COLORADO. — Townsend 's plants are 
the leading plants in our valley. We have 
been growing them here for more than fif- 
teen years and have never ' .>3t a crop. 

CONNECTICUT.— We picked 560 
quarts from our ever bearing garden to date 
and still lots of green fruit and blossoms 
October 1st. We only set 500 plants: only 
sorry we did not set several thousand. We 
are recommending your plants and service 
everywhere. 



THE BIG THREE— PREMIER, FORD, TOWNSEND'S 
BIG LATE. 



TRUE-TO-XAME SMALL FRUIT PLANTS 



35 



A to Z---Continued. 

DELAWARE.— While 1 have lived in 
this sreat strawberry section all my life I 
have never seen any real strawbenies until 
my Premier plants fruited this year, that I 
got from you. In the future I want no 
otlier but Premier. 

FLOR IDA. — Townsend's Missionary 
has put Florida on the map as a strawberry 
state. Long may the originator live. 

GEORGIA. — I am writing to you again 
for the fine plants you sent us last w-inter. 
This ever bearing garden has produced 
abundantly all summer and fall. Better 
than you claimed. 

IDAHO. — Folks told us that strawber- 
ries would not grow in this section. We 
have picked more than 300 quarts of the 
finest berries from our small garden this 
season and are deliglited with our adven- 
ture. Nothing like having them fresh 
every day for so long a season. 

ILLINOIS. — I am an old strawberry 
grower, have been in the busines for more 
than forty years. Have never seen such 
productive plants as you sent us. With 
very best regards to you and the son. 

INDIANA. — Our Townsend garden pro- 
duced more than 250 quarts of the finest 
berries, we sold more than S.50 worth and 
have plenty for winter. We will plant an 
acre this coming spring. 

IOWA. — We were induced by your writ- 
ings to set a patch and wish to say that it 
was the best investment we ever made. 
Could never get along without strawber 
ries any more. 

KANSAS. — We raised everything else, 
even "Cain" but no strawberries until thi? 
year. Want to thank you for getting us 
started. The row of ever bearing straw- 
berries have been a perfect show all sum- 



KENTUCKY.— Will you kindly send us 
a catalogue, we want to buy some plants 
like the ones you sent Mrs. Jones last year. 
We have never seen such fine berries as they 
produced. Also send book to Mr. Griffith, 
who is interested. 

MARYLAND.— While touring thru 
Maryland last year we saw some of your 
strawberry plant farms, as they were the 
finest kept plant fields I have ever seen, 
looked so vigorous, I want to try them out 
on the Western Shore. Kindly send Cat- 
alogue and price on three varieties, early 
to late, leaving the selection to you. 

MASSACHUSETTS.— You will be 
blessed for the good work you are doing, 
many homes are being made much happier, 
and children are being raised healthier, by 
your good work. We have never seen 
such wonderful varieties as you are send- 
ing out. I am an old man but keep your 
catalogue coming. Will always be inter- 
ested in your work. 



MICHIGAN.— Your plants are the har- 
die-vt and most vigorous plants we have ev- 
er grown. You must have a wonderful soil 
and Climate. Our small bed of plants is a 
show for the town. 

MINNESOTA.— The 100 Progressive, 
ever bearing strawberry plants produced 
more than 150 quarts this season. All we 
could expect in both quality and quantity. 

MISSISSIPPI.— The 500 plants fur- 
nished our Guests and Boarders this sum- 
mer with all the berries needed. And we 
wish to set another 500 plants this fail, as 
you say it is best to set the ever bearing 
overy year in your book. 

MISSOURI. — I only wish that we had 
set an acre of berries last spring, we 
have had fine success with the small lot 
and had lots of berries from the Lucky 
Boy and Progressive. Send us your cat- 
alogue soon as out, we want to book an or- 
der lor enough to set an acre or more. 

MONTANA. — Strawberries grow well 
here. I never saw better and bigger ber- 
ries than Lucky Boy produced last fall. 
How much for 1000 plants. 

NEBRASKA .—We produced 2500 
quarts from our small bed of 3000 plants. 
Grub work spoiled one end of our bed. We 
think Premier the greatest berry we have 
seen and best for table use. 

NEVADA. — We know of no one else in 
our section who grows strawberries. We 
have had good luck with our bed. We 
knew how to grow them before we came 
here. Every one is crazy over strawber- 
ries who sees ours and we are sending you 
a list of names of our neighbors who will 
want to order some of your garden selec- 
tions. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE.— We ordered Big 
Six Special last spring and must say we are 
well pleased. Lucky Boy is now loaded 
with fine large berries and all the plants are 
growing fine. Enclosed find a photo of 
our garden. The little fellow in the fore- 
groung is our little 12 year old son who has 
done most of the work in cultivating the 
berries. He is proud of his success. 

NEW .JERSEY.— We have never known 
what real pleaure was until this summer. 
We had you send our gardener 500 plants, 
Lucky Boy and Progressive, he had tnem 
growing nicely w-hen we arrived on Long 
Island for the summer. For more than 
two months we have had three times as 
many berries as we could use, and have 
given bushels away to our friends. Here 
is the picture with a stake with vour name 
on it— TOWNSEXDS STRAWBERRY 
GARDEN. 

NEW MEXICO.— We wish you to send 
us another lot of plants this spring. We 
have gotten used to berries now and can't 
get along without them. Those Progres- 
sive are fine and they fruit such a long 
time. 



LIBERTY BONDS EXCEPTED AT PAR VALUE. 



36 



E. W. TOWNSEND & SON— SQUARE DEAL NURSERY 



A to Z— (Continued) 

NEW YORK.— Enclosed find check for 
three orders for plants. We want them 
sent as per instructions to our three coun- 
try homes: Cuba, N. H. and L. I. We 
want plenty of Townsend's strawberries 
everywhere we go. 

NORTH CAROLINA.— I am writing 
this letter to let you know that we have had 
more pleasure from the ever bearing straw- 
berry plants purchased from you last year 
than anything we have ever grown. People 
told us ever bearing plants were no good in 
the South, and even you did not speak very 
highly of them for our section when we 
sent in the order. But I never saw more 
berries on any vine than on these Progres- 
sive plants. We furnished one big hotel 
berries for three months, besides having 
a plenty for ourselves. We want another 
supply this season and want the Progres- 
sive. 

OHIO.— Enclosed find picture of our 
little strawberry garden. Pretty good for 
two old codgers, I think each one over 70. 
But we have certainly enjoyed growing 
these plants and have not only gotten pleas- 
ure but some profit besides. As we have 
sold several bushels to our town folks at a 
nice price. Sorry we did not get started 
in the business sooner. If we should live 
will want to set a few more next spring. 

OKLAHOMA.— I would be ungrateful 
were I not to write you and thank you for 
the services rendered to us in our dealings 
with you. We knew nothing about straw- 
berries, never saw any growing. But with 
your fine plants and good advice we have 
gone through very nicely and have raised 
a fine crop of berries of which we are just'y 
proud. We kept no account of the quarts 1 
picked and sold but are sure that every 
plant has picked more than two quarts of 
berries and still loaded. We will set an- . 
other acre this winter if we can get the j 
plants, as we can find a good market for 
all we can grow. Please let us know if we | 
can get 10,000 Progressive and what time. 

OREGON.— Plants received in fine ! 
shape on the 22nd, just 10 days on the road, 
did not lose a plant. 

PENNSYLVANIA,— For ten straight 
years we have had your plants and never a 
single failure. 

RHODE ISLAND.— The plants shipped 
to us in April began to fruit in July and 
have never stopped, we have had all the 
berries we could use for four months, and 
much cheaper and better than we could 
have bought. This was our first effort in 
growing berries. I and my little boy of 
ten have done all the work both in setting 
and cultivating. We want a good supply 
next spring. 

SOUTH CAROLINA.— We had very 
good success with the strawberries last 
season and want some more plants this 
season as we have a good outlet here for 
such fine berries as we grew. Those Pre- 
miers were said to be the finest strawberries 
ever seen here. 



SOUTH DAKOTA.— We are sending to 
you again for a few more plants, our last 
lot certainly did fine and we want to renew 
the bed again this season. Send us all the 
Progressive you can for the amount en- 
closed. 

TENNESSEE.— Townsend 's plants are 
the finest plants ever grown in this county. 
We picked more berries from an acre than 
our neighbor did from two acres. Will 
want forty thousand Klondyke this spring. 

TEXAS. — It pays to set Townsend's 
plants even though you do have to send 
across the continent. Cheaper at $10.00 
than others at a gift. 

UTAH. — The berries from the plants 
you sent my father were the first real straw- 
berries ever seen here. Oh! they were so 
big and juicy. Send me 100 plants please 
same kind. I want to try my luck. 

VIRGINIA.— Plants received in fine 
condition, we are highly pleased with them. 
Expect to send you a $50 order next spring. 

WASHINGTON.— We have seen ber- 
ries, big berries and little berries, but we 
never saw any berries as large as World's 
Wonder before. Yes, they are like apples 
in size and big apples at that price, some 
measured over five inches around. 

WEST VIRGINIA.— The children have 
all had grand results with the plants sent 
to them last spring, we all feel much in- 
debted to your firm and wish you every 
success. And we believe you will derive 
great benefit from this transaction. With 
very best wishes. 

WISCONSIN.— Lucky Boy is all you 

claim for it. Finest berry I ever tasted 
and is beautiful and large. If it is better 
next spring than now I will not know what 
to do with it. 

WYOMING. — Nothing ever gave us 
more pleasure than the ever bearing straw- 
berry garden sent to us. For three months 
we have had plenty of fine berries and now 
it is coming cold we will miss them so much. 
We are thinking of moving them to a hot 
house so we can have them all winter, what 
do you think? 

NOTE — I think it is time to let them 
have a little rest and sleep. Would rec- 
ommend covering their heads with a good 
blanket of straw and let them rest and sleep 
until next spring. 

CANADA. — We have been growing 
your thoroughbred plants for several years, 
they are the hardiest and most productive 
plants we have ever grown, do much better 
for us than our home grown plants. 

CUBA. — Plants arrived in fine shape 
and growing nicely. 



Lacona, N. Y. 

Gents: — Plants bought of you two years 

ago have done wonderful and especially 

the ever bearing. C. H. S. 



HASTINGS BROS.— PRINTERS— SALISBURY, MD. 



Instructions to Purchasers 

Order Early. It is never wise tx> put off ordering your plants and seed until 
you are ready to plant them. Many of our customers order as soon as the catalog 
is received. They are always the lucky ones. 

How To Remit. By Money Order, Registered Letter, Bank Draft; Checks 
from our old customers. LIBERTY BONDS ACCEPTED at 5 per cent, above 
par. We allow you ^52.50 for a ^50.00 Bond. ^105.00 for ^100.00 Bond, in ex- 
change for plants. Be sure to register your Bond when mailing it to us. 

Time of Shipment. We commence to ship plants in October and continue 
all wmter and spring until May 15th. We do not advise summer and early fall 
planting of strawberry plants. If our customers insist on plants during September 
we will ship them at their risk at double the catalog price. We advise January, 
February and March planting for California, Texas and the South; April is the 
best for the balance of the country. 

Eastern Grown Plants. It is a known fact that we grow here on the East- 
ern Sho' of iMaryland, the hardiest nursery stock grown in the country. More 
than half of the strawberries grown in the North are grown from Maryland plants. 
There are two advantages in using our plants, ist— You get the hardiest plants 
possible to grow. 2nd— 'i ou can get our plants shipped to you when you need 
them to set out and do not have to wait on a Northern Nursey for plants until it 
is too late in season. We advise our Northern friends to have plants shipped out 
two weeks before they are to be set, so as to have plants on hand when it is con- 
venient to set them. 

On Receipt of Plants. On arrival keep plants from Sun and Wind, if not 

ready to set the plants at once it is best to open box and dip roots in water, repack 
or trench them in a V-shaped trench, packing soil around the roots and cover with 
straw, keep sprinkled. VC'e have kept plants in good condition for two months in 
this way. 

Twenty-Five to Bundle. We tie all plants 25 to a bundle; we do not sell 
less than 25 plants unless it is a new variety for testing. 

Our Packing the Best. We use light ventilated crates and patented cartons 
for Parcel Post and Express shipments, using plenty damp moss. We make no 
charge for packages. 

At Purchasers Risk. All plants shipped after May ist is at purchasers risk. 

True-To-Name. While we use every means to have our plants true-to-name 
(and we believe that we come as near doing this as anyone in the busmess), we will 
not be responsible for any sum greater than the stock should any prove otherwise 
than as represented. 

Guarantee. That we deliver to the transportation Co. in good order any or- 
der intrusted to our care. Having them sign two copies of Receipt, one of which 
will be mailed you day shipment is made. As we have no further control over 
shipment after it leaves our hands, our responsibility ceases on delivery' in good or- 
der to the Carriers. Any claims for damagts for delays should be made at point 
of delivery. If plants are delayed in transit, always examine at Office, and if found 
damaged by the delay, refuse same and notily us at once. Or if you accept the 
plants have the agent make notation on your Express bill of the condition. Unless 
you do this you cannot make collection of claim. 

C. O. D. We do not make C O.D. shipments unless at least 25 percent, of 
order is in cash. We do not pay transportation charges on any C.O.D. shipments 
and do not recommend shipments made this way.